Solve Funding Issues to Finance SME’s Growth Plans

SME’s are developing rapidly and flourishing enormously worldwide. Since its initiation and establishment, there some extremely important and basic requirements to be met and adopted. These requirements include; infrastructure and employment requirements, a developed information technology infrastructure along with funding sources, which is the most important aspect of the sustainability of these SME’s.Funding sources are the strengthening pillars for such small and medium-sized enterprises.SME (small to medium enterprise) is a convenient term for categorizing businesses and other organizations that are somewhere between “small office-home office” (SOHO) size and the larger enterprise.Unavailability of timely and adequate funds has an immense adverse effect on the growth of these SME’s which in turn affects the growth of the Indian economy. Such insufficient funding sources serve as the crucial barrier in the development and sustenance of SME’s.The economic development in India is hugely dependent on the performance of small or micro and medium enterprises. They are the powerhouse of innovation, entrepreneurial spirit and enormous talent, which is required for the nation’s development in the economic sector.Indian SME sector:This sector contributes to the industrial output, provides employment to masses. They also contribute widely in exports. These organizations produce quality products for national and international markets.The presence of SME’s is greatly acknowledged. The manufacturing sector is rapidly advancing because of the contribution of these organizations.Undoubtedly, these SME’s are performing their best, despite their limited sources. Still, there are multiple cases of these organizations facing funding issues.The solution for funding issues faced by SME’s:The government has been taking initiatives like setting up the National Manufacturing Competitiveness Council, announcing National Manufacturing Policy (NMP) and much more to energize and boost the manufacturing sector.


Banks have made stable strides to support SME’s. However, such approaches by banks for funding are limited and restricted because by controlling and managing risk, they ultimately create value. Thus, banks are not always a rightful solution as a funding source.Access to capital markets is rare, in the case of SME’s. Therefore, such organizations hugely depend on borrowed funds from some financial institutions and banks.Mostly commercial banks provide extended working capital and financial institutions provide investment credits. Universal banking services, working capital, and term loans are becoming available for SME’s for funding.Meanwhile, the traditional requirements of finance are still actively in use, for creating the asset and working capital.Globalization is generating a demand for introduction and development new financial and support services.The RBI should issue necessary guidelines to all banks on credit flow. Moreover, the Government should work rigorously to create an environment conducive for growth for the SMEs that restrains the need for capital and debt.Setting up SME-targeted banks that provide priority to lending to the SME sector.Financing schemes for SMEs can be formulated and be beneficial. These might be highly risky, but promises great returns. There is also a need for a reduction in the interest rates. SMEs has been paying high-interest rates for bank loans. The loan structure should restructure, on an urgent basis as lower interest rates are an extremely important need for SME’s.Delayed payments are yet another major area of concern for SME’s that lead to reduced working capital.Recycling of funds and various business operations are majorly affected due to delay in dues settlement. Defaulting customers are mostly large enterprises and the SMEs due to fear of losing business are not able to report against them.An automated portal could be established by the government, wherein SMEs makes available their customer detailings.The government can also send automated reminders to defaulting organizations, in the cases of payment defaults.As it is well known all over that, for the government, the Budget is an occasion to set up new financial goals and economic goals, allocate financial resources and provide policy directions. During Budget presentations, the Finance Minister announces new policies, schemes, projects and allocates finance for the development of several sectors of the economy, to meet the overall goals of socioeconomic growth.For SMEs, the potential sources of finance are very limited. However, their usefulness is limited because of mostly practical problems. Crowdfunding also supplies chain financing are some funding sources.Some more funding sources for SME’sThe owner, family, and friends of SMEAn excellent source of finance. Mostly, such investors, invest not just for financial gains and are willing to accept lower returns than other investors. However, the key limitation, for most of these organizations, is that, that the finance they can build personally, from friends and family, is limited.Trade creditSMEs can take credit from their respective suppliers. It is however just short-term and, if the suppliers are big companies who have identified and categorized them as potentially risky SME, the possibility to extend may be limited, for the credit period.The business angelA wealthy individual who is willing to take the risk of investing in SMEs. However, they are just found in rarity. Once such an individual is interested they can become useful to the SME, as they have great business plans and contacts.


Factoring and invoice discountingThese sources help the organizations to raise finance. It is only short-term and is mostly more costly than an overdraft. However, with the SME growth rate, their receivables will grow thereby the amount they can borrow from invoice discounting will also rapidly growing.LeasingLeasing assets is a better option rather than buying.them, as it avoids to raise the capital cost. However, leasing is mostly possible on tangible assets.ListingAn SME can become quoted by acquiring a listing on the stock exchange. Thus, raising finance would become less of an issue. But before listing can be considered the organization must grow to the considerable size that a listing is feasible.Supply chain financingSCF is new and is somehow different than the methods of traditional working capital financing, such as offering settlement discounts, as it promotes collaboration between the buyers and sellers in the supply chain.The venture capitalistA venture capitalist organization is mostly a subsidiary of a company that has worthy cash holdings and might need to be invested. Such subsidiaries are at high-risk, potentially high-return part of their investment portfolio. To attract venture capital funding, such organization has to have a business strategy and idea, that may help to create, high returns that the venture capitalist is seeking. Thus, operating in regular business, venture capitalist financing may be impossible for many SME’s.The above mentioned are the various solutions for SME’s to deal with the issue insufficient funding sources.

Car Finance – What You Should Know About Dealer Finance

Car finance has become big business. A huge number of new and used car buyers in the UK are making their vehicle purchase on finance of some sort. It might be in the form of a bank loan, finance from the dealership, leasing, credit card, the trusty ‘Bank of Mum & Dad’, or myriad other forms of finance, but relatively few people actually buy a car with their own cash anymore.

A generation ago, a private car buyer with, say, £8,000 cash to spend would usually have bought a car up to the value of £8,000. Today, that same £8,000 is more likely to be used as a deposit on a car which could be worth many tens of thousands, followed by up to five years of monthly payments.

With various manufacturers and dealers claiming that anywhere between 40% and 87% of car purchases are today being made on finance of some sort, it is not surprising that there are lots of people jumping on the car finance bandwagon to profit from buyers’ desires to have the newest, flashiest car available within their monthly cashflow limits.

The appeal of financing a car is very straightforward; you can buy a car which costs a lot more than you can afford up-front, but can (hopefully) manage in small monthly chunks of cash over a period of time. The problem with car finance is that many buyers don’t realise that they usually end up paying far more than the face value of the car, and they don’t read the fine print of car finance agreements to understand the implications of what they’re signing up for.

For clarification, this author is neither pro- or anti-finance when buying a car. What you must be wary of, however, are the full implications of financing a car – not just when you buy the car, but over the full term of the finance and even afterwards. The industry is heavily regulated in the UK, but a regulator can’t make you read documents carefully or force you to make prudent car finance decisions.

Financing through the dealership

For many people, financing the car through the dealership where you are buying the car is very convenient. There are also often national offers and programs which can make financing the car through the dealer an attractive option.

This blog will focus on the two main types of car finance offered by car dealers for private car buyers: the Hire Purchase (HP) and the Personal Contract Purchase (PCP), with a brief mention of a third, the Lease Purchase (LP). Leasing contracts will be discussed in another blog coming soon.

What is a Hire Purchase?

An HP is quite like a mortgage on your house; you pay a deposit up-front and then pay the rest off over an agreed period (usually 18-60 months). Once you have made your final payment, the car is officially yours. This is the way that car finance has operated for many years, but is now starting to lose favour against the PCP option below.

There are several benefits to a Hire Purchase. It is simple to understand (deposit plus a number of fixed monthly payments), and the buyer can choose the deposit and the term (number of payments) to suit their needs. You can choose a term of up to five years (60 months), which is longer than most other finance options. You can usually cancel the agreement at any time if your circumstances change without massive penalties (although the amount owing may be more than your car is worth early on in the agreement term). Usually you will end up paying less in total with an HP than a PCP if you plan to keep the car after the finance is paid off.

The main disadvantage of an HP compared to a PCP is higher monthly payments, meaning the value of the car you can usually afford is less.

An HP is usually best for buyers who; plan to keep their cars for a long time (ie – longer than the finance term), have a large deposit, or want a simple car finance plan with no sting in the tail at the end of the agreement.

What is a Personal Contract Purchase?

A PCP is often given other names by manufacturer finance companies (eg – BMW Select, Volkswagen Solutions, Toyota Access, etc.), and is very popular but more complicated than an HP. Most new car finance offers advertised these days are PCPs, and usually a dealer will try and push you towards a PCP over an HP because it is more likely to be better for them.

Like the HP above, you pay a deposit and have monthly payments over a term. However, the monthly payments are lower and/or the term is shorter (usually a max. of 48 months), because you are not paying off the whole car. At the end of the term, there is still a large chunk of the finance unpaid. This is usually called a GMFV (Guaranteed Minimum Future Value). The car finance company guarantees that, within certain conditions, the car will be worth at least as much as the remaining finance owed. This gives you three options:

1) Give the car back. You won’t get any money back, but you won’t have to pay out the remainder. This means that you have effectively been renting the car for the whole time.

2) Pay out the remaining amount owed (the GMFV) and keep the car. Given that this amount could be many thousands of pounds, it is not usually a viable option for most people (which is why they were financing the car in the first place), which usually leads to…

3) Part-exchange the car for a new (or newer) one. The dealer will assess your car’s value and take care of the finance payout. If your car is worth more than the GMFV, you can use the difference (equity) as a deposit on your next car.

The PCP is best suited for people who want a new or near-new car and fully intend to change it at the end of the agreement (or possibly even sooner). For a private buyer, it usually works out cheaper than a lease or contract hire finance product. You are not tied into going back to the same manufacturer or dealership for your next car, as any dealer can pay out the finance for your car and conclude the agreement on your behalf. It is also good for buyers who want a more expensive car with a lower cashflow than is usually possible with an HP.

The disadvantage of a PCP is that it tends to lock you into a cycle of changing your car every few years to avoid a large payout at the end of the agreement (the GMFV). Borrowing money to pay out the GMFV and keep the car usually gives you a monthly payment that is very little cheaper than starting again on a new PCP with a new car, so it nearly always sways the owner into replacing it with another car. For this reason, manufacturers and dealers love PCPs because it keeps you coming back every 3 years rather than keeping your car for 5-10 years!

What is a Lease Purchase?

An LP is a bit of a hybrid between an HP and a PCP. You have a deposit and low monthly payments like a PCP, with a large final payment at the end of the agreement. However, unlike a PCP, this final payment (often called a balloon) is not guaranteed. This means that if your car is worth less than the amount owing and you want to sell/part-exchange it, you would have to pay out any difference (called negative equity) before even thinking about paying a deposit on your next car.

Read the fine print

What is absolutely essential for anyone buying a car on finance is to read the contract and consider it carefully before signing anything. Plenty of people make the mistake of buying a car on finance and then end up being unable to make their monthly payments. Given that your finance period may last for the next five years, it is critical that you carefully consider what may happen in your life over those next five years. Many heavily-financed sports cars have had to be returned, often with serious financial consequences for the owners, because of unexpected pregnancies!

As part of purchasing a car on finance, you should consider and discuss all of the various finance options available and make yourself aware of the pros and cons of different car finance products to ensure you are making informed decisions about your money.